EPA RELEASES FRAMEWORK FOR FUTURE CERCLA 108(b) FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY RULEMAKING

Posted on October 26, 2015 by Ronald R. Janke

The Environmental Protection Agency has released a framework for its future financial responsibility rulemaking under CERCLA 108(b).  Although this framework states EPA’s current thinking only in general terms, this document represents the clearest public statement of the agency’s intentions since it announced its intention to develop such rules for hardrock mining facilities in 2009.  This framework also informs of EPA’s intentions toward other classes of facilities in future rulemakings under this authority.  This framework appeared as part of a court filing on August 31, 2015 and was the subject of an EPA webinar on September 29, 2015.

EPA states that the regulatory approach it is considering has five foundational components. First, the universe of facilities to be regulated are hardrock mines and “primary processing activities located at or near the mine site that are under the same operational control as the mine.”  Second, the flow of funds from the financial responsibility instrument to the CERCLA would supplement existing CERCLA sources of funding, as EPA intends to use its existing CERCLA enforcement processes first to clean up sites.  Third, the scope and amount of financial responsibility would consist of three components: (1) response costs, calculated based on a model being developed by EPA to reflect the primary site conditions; (2) a fixed amount for natural resource damages and (3) a fixed amount for health assessment costs.

Fourth, EPA does not intend to preempt state, tribal and local government mining and reclamation closure requirements.  EPA intends to avoid preemption under CERCLA 114(d) by adopting financial responsibility requirements that are “in connection with liability for a release of a hazardous substance” in contrast to “many” state regulatory requirements designed to assure compliance with reclamation and closure requirements.  Fifth, EPA likewise intends that its CERCLA financial responsibility requirements will be distinct from federal closure and reclamation bonding requirements imposed by other federal agencies under other laws with jurisdiction over mining on federal lands.

The morsel of information provided in EPA’s framework leaves interested parties hungry for more information by what is left unsaid.  Particular concerns are the response cost model and its inputs and the path that EPA intends to tread around the multitude of existing financial assurance mechanisms that already apply to hardrock mining to avoid duplication and preemption.  In this regard, EPA could not have picked a more difficult place to begin drafting CERCLA 108(b) rules than for this industry, which has in place many and extensive financial assurances governing the impact of its operations.