“Move Not Away from Struggle, But from Stillness”

Posted on July 13, 2017 by Renee Cipriano

Out of struggle and challenges comes a brighter future.  For environmental practitioners, the time is now to engage in struggle. 

I witnessed firsthand the creation and evolution of the Environmental Council of the States (ECOS).  Back in 1994, ECOS was the brainchild of several state environmental commissioners, including Mary Gade, the then Director of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency.  In ECOS’s early years, the federal-state relationship was evolving, and state regulatory sophistication could not be denied.  The path to create a strong state organization with meaning was not easy and the young organization was forced to deal many struggles coming into its own.  As Ms. Gade explained in a 1996 American Bar Association article published in Natural Resources & the Environment, Winter 1996, “[t]he states were coming of age.  The formation of ECOS is a quantum leap forward in the ongoing shift in the balance of responsibility for protecting the nation’s environment.” She continued, “ECOS may not seem at all exceptional, yet more than any other environmental organization, it embodies the rising environmental leadership of states and the long overdue transfer of power in the federal–state relationship.”

Challenges and struggles have characterized the federal-state partnership upon which the nation’s regulatory system was built. The formation of ECOS helped the states collaborate and deal with the struggles together head on.  Today, no question exists that states are primarily responsible for the administration of environmental laws in this country, assuming more than 96% of the delegable authorities under federal law.  The states are on the frontline of enforcement, permitting, innovation and streamlining efforts.  The public looks to them first for answers.  Industry relies on the states to be effective partners, balancing the needs of industry and the public while allowing industry to run operations efficiently and in compliance.

Over the life of ECOS, state environmental regulators have been delegated more responsibility for environmental protection, education and enforcement but the resources provided them have measurably decreased.  Federal monies dedicated to financially support state programs have declined and are jeopardized further by proposed budget cuts.  At the same time, state elected officials face their own budget crises.  In response, state environmental protection agencies are being challenged to operate with little to no state funding and instead rely on federal funding and increased fees imposed on regulated entities.

With funding issues looming larger today than ever, there is a need to revisit both our national approach to environmental protection and, whether we are effectively enlisting the federal-state partnership to avoid staff duplication, regulatory confusion and resource waste.  For example, states and stakeholders should be able to rely on the state’s implementation of federally approved state programs without facing contrary interpretations from U.S. EPA.  Some state decisions are scrutinized repeatedly, with no meaningful purpose or resulting benefit; sometimes years after decisions are made. Stakeholders should be able to expect that if U.S. EPA identifies a deficiency in the state administration of a delegated program, U.S EPA will act swiftly under the authority granted to it by Congress to demand a fix to deficiency and approve the state’s modification just as timely.  And states should be able to rely on U.S. EPA to ensure that state delegated programs it approves set a level playing field across the nation to avoid disadvantaging economic growth in one state simply because another state’s approved program does not quite meet U.S. EPA’s interpretation of federal standards.

This brings us to the current Administration’s work around regulatory reform.  See President Trump, E.O. 13771, “Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs (Jan. 30, 2017); President Trump, E.O. 13777, “Enforcing the Regulatory Reform Agenda” (Feb. 24, 2017); EPA, Evaluation of Existing Regulations (Apr. 13, 2017).  Although many see “regulatory reform” under a Pruitt U.S. EPA as the end of environmental protection, I prefer to see it as an opportunity to examine holistically our current environmental regulatory framework and identify innovative ways to build on our environmental successes.  Even more importantly, I also see it as an opportunity to reinvigorate the national conversation around the federal-state relationship and embrace more fully the unparalleled state leadership we have in our country.  There is a rightful place for both U.S. EPA and the states as we move towards addressing our future environmental challenges but we can no longer support or afford duplication and burden without purpose.

In June, 2017, ECOS issued a document entitled COOPERATIVE FEDERALISM 2.0: Achieving and maintaining a Clean Environmental and Protecting Public Health.  Under the leadership of Executive Director and General Counsel Alexandra Dunn, and through a consensus based process among members of ECOS, this blueprint for the future presents both the principles that should guide the federal-state relationship and lists the important “policy neutral issues” where application of cooperative federalism could be focused.  This document is not only insightful but timely and provides the opportunity for positive reforms that will allow the nation to continue its great work of environmental protection into the future.  It is a must read.

My yoga teacher always tells the class to “move away from struggle” when she is challenging us with new and different yoga moves. I find though, that unless I struggle, my moves will never improve.   Engaging in the process of change can be a struggle—from start to finish.  But we cannot do better if we don’t.  The national conversation is now, and we are only wasting our opportunity for an even better environmental regulatory system for the future if we decide to move away from struggle and move to stillness.

Partners?

Posted on June 25, 2013 by Steve McKinney

Congress said EPA and the States are partners in implementing the Clean Air Act.  It’s simple: EPA sets pollutant-by-pollutant standards for clean air (NAAQS) and each State develops and implements a state-specific plan to meet and maintain those NAAQS.  Each partner is well-positioned and equipped to perform its assignment and Congress included appropriate “carrots and sticks” in the Act to ensure that both do their job.  The Supreme Court has extolled Congress’s partnership approach and EPA routinely professes its deep appreciation of its State partners and their important role.  So wassup with EPA suddenly demanding that thirty-six States delete rules about excess emissions during startup, shutdown and malfunction (SSM) that have been EPA-approved for 30 to 40 years?

On February 22, in response to a 2011 petition by Sierra Club, EPA proposed to “call” thirty-six state implementation plans (SIPs) because they contain affirmative defense, exemption, or director’s  discretion rules for excess emissions during periods of SSM. EPA’s previous approval of the offending rules wasn’t even a speedbump.  EPA also rejected any obligation to connect the offending rules with air pollution problems in the affected States.  EPA’s legal position on how the States should enforce their CAA permits was enough to shuck the partnership and impose the federal will.  And EPA didn’t even ask nicely.  State requests for information about EPA’s consideration of their SIPs were ignored and States were given 30 days to comment on a proposal EPA took more than a year to develop.  EPA gave its State partners another 45 days only after more than a dozen State Attorneys General jointly asked for more time and the Senate Committee considering the new Administrator’s confirmation made the same request.

When comments were filed on May 13, thirty affected States filed comments; none of them supported EPA’s proposed call of their SIP.  Not even EPA’s regular supporters on issues like tougher NAAQS thought EPA’s dictation was a good idea.  Complaints from EPA’s partners ranged from being wrongfully excluded from EPA’s evaluation of their SIP to EPA trampling on the States’ planning and implementation responsibilities to EPA creating a lot of work that could have been avoided if EPA had just talked to them.  No amount of spin can make this look good for state–federal relationships.

So why?  Well, Sierra Club did ask for it.  Maybe because an obvious compliance impact is on emission limits with continuous monitoring and short averaging times like opacity.  And maybe because coal-fired power plants always have opacity limits and deleting common excess emission rules will set those sources up for widespread enforcement litigation.  Or, maybe the States and the previous EPAs had it wrong for all these years and someone finally straightened everyone else out.  Like so many conundrums of this type, it might take some judges to give us the answer.

Pursuant to a settlement agreement with Sierra Club, EPA must finalize the SSM SIP Call by August 27, 2013.