Justice Scalia and Environmental Law, Part II: Takings and Administrative Law

Posted on June 9, 2016 by James May

Justice Scalia’s jurisprudence had a huge impact on environmental law. Part I focused on standing. This short piece addresses his impact on takings and Administrative Law.

Takings

Modern takings jurisprudence is also Justice Scalia’s handiwork. He, more than any other Justice, was inclined to find government regulation – particularly that which serves environmental ends – “goes too far” and thus constitutes a regulatory taking warranting just compensation. In Lucas v. South Carolina Coastal Council, he held for the majority that a state law designed to protect barrier islands constituted a compensable taking when it had the effect of depriving a developer of what he considered to be all economic use. And in Nollan v. California Coastal Commission, Justice Scalia—again for the majority—held that a requirement that a shorefront property owner maintain a public pathway to a public beach was “illogical” and constituted a compensable taking.

Justice Scalia’s jurisprudence makes policymakers think twice about regulating in the environmental realm.

Deference to Agency Rulemaking

Justice Scalia was consistently skeptical of environmentally-protective interpretations by federal agencies, especially those by EPA. In Rapanos v. EPA, writing for a plurality of the Supreme Court, he rejected the Army Corps of Engineers’ interpretation of the Clean Water Act’s term “navigable waters” to include temporally-saturated areas, instead insisting on a direct surface water connection to a water that is “navigable in fact.” Likewise, he joined the Court’s decision in SWANCC v. Army Corps of Engineers, holding that Congress did not intend to permit the Corps and EPA to regulate dredging and filling of isolated ponds and wetlands that are not adjacent to otherwise navigable waters, under what was known as the “migratory bird rule.” Most recently, in Michigan v. EPA, he wrote for the majority to invalidate EPA’s mercury and toxics rule, finding it unreasonable “to impose billions of dollars in economic costs in return for a few dollars in health or environmental benefits.” And shortly before he died, he joined four other justices to order a stay of EPA’s Clean Power Plan.

Yet Scalia was more inclined to defer to EPA interpretations that were less environment-minded. For instance, in Entergy v. Riverkeeper, he wrote on behalf of the majority to uphold EPA’s use of cost-benefit analysis in assessing “best technology available” for minimizing the adverse environmental effects of cooling water intake structures under section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act. Likewise, he dissented in EPA’s favor in Massachusetts v. EPA, voting to uphold the agency’s decision at that point that greenhouse gases are not “air pollutants” under the Clean Air Act.

Early during his tenure on the bench, however, Justice Scalia seemed more inclined to endorse the edict from Chevron U.S.A., Inc. v. NRDC, to defer to “reasonable” statutory interpretations from mission-oriented agencies. For example, in EDF v. Chicago, Scalia on behalf of the Court upheld EPA’s interpretation under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act that “solid waste” includes ash from municipal waste incinerators. And then in dissent he decried the result in U.S. v. Mead Corp., where the Court strayed from the Chevron standard by granting only “power to persuade” as opposed to “reasonableness” deference to agency interpretations that are not the result of a deliberative process.

Last, Whitman v. American Trucking stands as a bit of an outlier to Scalia’s seeming antipathy to EPA’s reach, in which his majority opinion upheld as an “intelligible principle” under the non-delegation doctrine Congress having EPA establish national ambient air quality standards that are “requisite” to protect human health and the environment.

Justice Scalia’s views on deference to rulemaking gave agencies – except for EPA – more leeway. For further reading on these subjects, please see Principles of Constitutional Environmental Law.

Justice Scalia and Environmental Law, Part I: Standing

Posted on June 9, 2016 by James May

Justice Scalia’s jurisprudence had a huge impact on environmental law. Part I focuses on standing. Part II (a forthcoming post) then turns to takings and Administrative Law.

Standing 

Justice Scalia’s most lasting legacy on environmental law is how his jurisprudence makes it more difficult for environmental plaintiffs to demonstrate constitutional standing under Article III of the Constitution. Since at least Sierra Club v. Morton, plaintiffs needed to show that they possessed an “injury in fact,” which could be commercial, economic, aesthetic, or environmental. Raising the bar, Scalia stated that plaintiffs must demonstrate at an “irreducible minimum”: (1) imminent and concrete “injury-in-fact” that is (2) fairly “traceable” to the defendant’s actions, and (3) “redressible” by the court. Applying this standard, Scalia found standing lacking in Lujan v. National Wildlife Federation, because using land “in the vicinity of” affected federal land wasn’t sufficient, and in Lujan v. Defenders of Wildlife, due to the absence of what has come to be known as “tickets in hand” to return to the places of alleged injury. Dissenting in Defenders of Wildlife, Justice Blackmun, bemoaned Scalia’s new requirements as “a slash-and-burn expedition through the law of environmental standing.”

Justice Scalia then dissented in Friends of the Earth v. Laidlaw Environmental Services v. EPA, when the majority held that it is injury to the person, and not the environment, that matters in standing analysis. There, he complained that the majority had proceeded “to marry private wrong with public remedy in a union that violates traditional principles of federal standing—thereby permitting law enforcement to be placed in the hands of private individuals. I dissent from all of this.”

Justice Scalia was skeptical that the effects of climate change could ever support standing, even for states. Speaking from his dissent in Massachusetts v. EPA, Scalia would have found that petitioning states lacked standing to challenge the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) failure to institute rulemaking to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from stationary sources, thereby rejecting that states are entitled to “special solicitude” in standing analysis.

Justice Scalia was more inclined to find standing when litigants challenged environmentally-protective agency action. For example, writing for a plurality, he found that alleged injury to economic interests to water districts and to corporate ranching and agricultural interests was sufficient injury in Bennett v. Spear. Moreover, he held that homeowners possessed both standing and a cause of action to challenge an EPA-issued but not enforced administrative compliance order in Sackett v. EPA.

Concur or not, Justice Scalia’s standing test took hold and stands firm. For further reading on this subject, please see Principles of Constitutional Environmental Law.

THE (NON)FINALITY OF SUPREME COURT OPINIONS

Posted on December 17, 2014 by Richard Lazarus

Last spring, as the Washington Post reported, I caught Justice Scalia in an embarrassing blunder that prompted the Justice to revise overnight the version of his dissenting opinion in EPA v. EME Homer City Generation, L.P. posted on the Supreme Court’s website. Scalia’s stumble? In his zeal to condemn EPA for what the Justice plainly considered to be an outrageous construction of Clean Air Act language in EME Homer, he somehow managed to get completely backwards what EPA had argued in Whitman v. American Trucking Ass’n.  And as the environmental law blogosphere cheerily trumpeted, what made the mistake especially “cringeworthy” was that Scalia himself had written the Court’s opinion in Whitman, so one was hard-pressed to blame just his law clerk.  (On the other hand, here at Harvard Law School, I was very much hoping it was not a Harvard clerk.)

However, what most fascinated me about the entire episode was not Scalia’s initial mistake, but the Court’s procedures for correction. The only reason the public knew about this particular correction was because Justice Scalia’s initial error had been so widely publicized, which was what in turn led me and others to spot the correction and publicize that as well. Otherwise, the correction was made entirely without the Court itself providing any notice. The slip opinion that appeared on the Court’s website was simply different from the one appearing the very next morning.

I was likely more focused on the Court’s process for correction because at that very moment, I had just completed a law review article on the Court’s longstanding, but wholly unappreciated, practice of revising slip opinions in just this kind of clandestine manner. And, not just dissenting opinions as in EME Homer, but also majority opinions of the Court.  The Court has literally always done this sort of thing, although no one had ever called them out on it.

I first became aware of the practice as a lawyer for the U.S. Department of Justice in 1987 when, at EPA’s prompting, we urged the Court to correct a “mistake” in its original slip opinion in International Paper Co. v. Ouellette, a significant Clean Water Act case, because of EPA’s concern that certain language in that opinion mischaracterized the role of citizen suits.  At our client’s urging, my then-boss, the Solicitor General, formally notified the Court of this “formal error” and the Court changed the language, precisely as we recommended, to eliminate the issue. As a result, the language appearing several years later in the bound volume of the U.S. Reports differed substantively from the original slip opinion language. No notice of this change was given, including to any of the parties in the case. The U.S. had participated as an amicus.

When this happened in 1987, I vowed someday to write on the topic.  It took me only about 27 years to do so, and the upshot appeared a few days ago in a lengthy article published in the December 2014 issue of the Harvard Law Review.  The article undertakes a full look at the Court’s practice, extending back to its earliest days until the present. (For example, Chief Justice Roger Taney added 18 pages to his opinion for the Court in Dred Scott v. Sandford in 1857, after the original opinion announcement.)

In my partial defense, not only did the necessary archival research require significant work over an extended time period, but the topic invariably took a backseat to other, seemingly more pressing, topics on which I was engaged.   In all events, the final article is now available here, and includes discussion of EME Homer, International Paper Company, and other environmental cases.