Who’s doing a good job at water conservation? The answer might surprise you.

Posted on July 9, 2014 by Patricia Barmeyer

I was surprised by a recent piece on National Public Radio. California is in an historic drought, as we all know.  The story reported that Sacramento, the capital city of California, is now-- just now!--installing residential water meters.  Water meters are the simplest of all water conservation devices, and yet, the story reports, more than 250,000 households in California receive unmetered water.  Sacramento and other California cities are working now to remedy this obvious shortcoming.

The story invited a comparison to metro Atlanta.  As you may remember, metro Atlanta was the poster child for drought in 2007.  Lake Lanier, Atlanta’s primary source of drinking water, was at historically low levels.  Both Florida and Alabama accused metro Atlanta of taking more than its fair share of the streams that rise in Georgia and flow to our neighboring states.  The assertion that metro Atlanta was not managing its water resources wisely was trumpeted loudly and often repeated.  And even today, you’ll find “experts” opining that metro Atlanta has done “nothing” to address its water supply use. 

But are these claims true?  Hardly.  The fact is that metro Atlanta has been working hard for the past fifteen years to become a conservation leader, and  its efforts are paying off.  From 2000 to 2010, total water withdrawn from streams and reservoirs by metro Atlanta decreased by almost 10% while the population increased by almost 25% (1 million people).   Total per capita use in metro Atlanta is now just 106 gallons per day.  This is on par with the best of the best, and it is far better than peer cities in the Southeast.  Per capita usage in Birmingham, Alabama, for example, is more than 160 gallons per day.

This progress is the result of aggressive conservation planning at the State, regional, and local levels.  For example, the Metropolitan North Georgia Water Planning District has required local providers to do the unthinkable, which is not only to require metering, but also to put those meters to good use by charging more per gallon as usage increases.  99% of the population of the District is now subject to conservation pricing.  The impact has been dramatic.  Meanwhile, at the State level, the Georgia Water Stewardship Act of 2010 has helped to establish a culture of conservation statewide.

On top of these and many other efforts to reduce the amount of water withdrawn from the environment, metro Atlanta water suppliers have spent more than $2 billion on advanced systems to recycle the water withdrawn.  The District now recycles over 60 million gallons per day by discharging highly treated wastewater directly into area drinking water reservoirs.

In short, metro Atlanta is way beyond meters.  Are you surprised?