EPA Finalizes New Clean Water Act Section 401 Certification Rules—Will States Bite Back?

Posted on June 10, 2020 by Rick Glick

On June 1, 2020, the Environmental Protection Agency released its new rules implementing section 401 of the Clean Water Act (CWA). Section 401 provides that before a federal agency can approve a project that may result in a “discharge to the navigable waters” the applicant must obtain water quality certifications from the affected state. The certification encompasses compliance with water quality standards and “any other appropriate requirement of State law.”

However, the state is deemed to have waived its delegated authority under section 401 if it "fails or refuses to act on a request for certification, within a reasonable period of time (which shall not exceed one year) after receipt of such request." The rules adopt the D.C. Circuit’s view in Hoopa Valley Tribe v. FERC that one year means one year, and they narrow the scope of conditions that states can impose on a project as part of the certification.

One Year Means One Year

The section 401 process has been controversial in the context of energy infrastructure projects requiring federal approvals, such as natural gas pipelines, LNG terminals and hydroelectric facilities. Historically, states have commonly avoided the one-year limit by allowing multiple cycles of withdrawal-and-resubmittal of 401 certification applications, stretching the review period over many years.

This in part was thought necessary to allow adequate time to assess the water quality effects and appropriate mitigation measures for complex facilities, which would often draw comments from many stakeholders seeking to influence the terms of a new certification. However, in Hoopa Valley the court rejected this workaround and denounced the withdrawal-and-resubmittal practice as a tool “for states to use Section 401 to hold federal licensing hostage.”

Shortly after Hoopa Valley, President Trump issued an Executive Order “Promoting Energy Infrastructure and Economic Growth,” for the stated purpose of making the regulatory process more efficient and creating “increased regulatory certainty.” Among other things, the Executive Order directed EPA to review federal policy and regulations on section 401 implementation in light of the Hoopa Valley decision.

With the new rules, EPA has adopted Hoopa Valley’s position that the one-year limit of section 401 actually means one year, and explicitly rejected state practices resulting in certification processes extending to several years. The rules make clear that upon receiving a complete 401 certification application, a state has one year to grant, grant with conditions, or deny the certification. Failure to do so will result in the state having waived its delegated authority with respect to the project under consideration.

Scope of 401 Certification Conditions

The Supreme Court has ruled that section 401 confers on a state broad authority to impose conditions on a water quality certification. In the 1994 case of PUD No. 1 v. Wash. Dep’t of Ecology, the Court found that water quality certifications could include conditions related to quantity of water flow, holding that a state could require minimum stream flows as part of the section 401 certification. Twelve years later, the Court found in S.D. Warren Co. v. Me. Bd. Of Envtl. Prot. that states have broad latitude in imposing conditions that are not directly water quality-related, such as provision for fish passage or recreation.

However, in the preamble to the rules, EPA found that nothing in the CWA nor section 401 contains any statement suggesting that section 401 “authorize[s] consideration or the imposition of certification conditions based on air quality or transportation concerns, public access to waters, energy policy, or other multi-media or non-water quality impacts.”

EPA reasoned that the phrase “any other appropriate requirement of State law,” often used to justify broad state authority, only included “those provisions of State or Tribal law that contain requirements for point source discharges into water of the United States.” The rejection of conditions not directly related to water quality seems to ignore Supreme Court guidance in PUD No.1 and S.D. Warren.

The Rules’ Prospects in Court

The new rules are certain to draw legal challenges from environmental groups and from states concerned that EPA’s interpretation denies them the full authority conferred under the statute.

EPA’s interpretation that one year means one year is consistent with Hoopa Valley and with subsequent decisions and may fare well in court.  However, narrowing the scope of the states’ authority to impose conditions on a certification will face serious judicial scrutiny in light of PUD No. 1 and S.D. Warren. In addition, opponents of the new rules may take issue with EPA’s authority, or lack thereof, to make rules governing how a program delegated to states should be administered.

Not So Fast! Oregon DEQ Objects to EPA’s Draft NPDES Permits for Lower Columbia River Dams

Posted on May 21, 2020 by Rick Glick

On May 15, 2020, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (“DEQ”) submitted a letter to the Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) in which it objected to EPA’s draft water quality discharge permits (“NPDES permits”) relating to four federal dams on the Lower Columbia River. The dams in question are Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day, and McNary. The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (“USACE”) operates the dams, which are key elements of the Federal Columbia River Power System (“FCRPS”).

Section 402 of the Clean Water Act (“CWA”) requires a NPDES permit for discharges of pollutants from “point sources.” A point source is a defined conveyance for direct discharges of pollutants, like a pipe. Courts have considered dams to be nonpoint sources that do not require permits, as dams typically do not add pollutants, but merely pass upstream pollutants through their spillways. However, dams with hydroelectric facilities often discharge oily waste from onsite transformers, which could include PCBs.

On that basis, EPA has determined that each of the four Lower Columbia dams require a NPDES permit to cover the direct discharges resulting from power operations. EPA specifically did not address indirect discharges through the spillways or turbines.

Section 401(a)(2) requires that EPA notify states whose water quality may be affected by the permits, including Oregon. In its letter, DEQ notes that although the NPDES permits do not address pass-through pollutants, section 401 allows DEQ to consider potential violations of any water quality parameter resulting from total dam operations. DEQ therefore objects to the permits and requests imposition of certain conditions to meet numeric and narrative temperature criteria, total dissolved gas (“TDG”) levels, biocriteria, and toxics substances criteria.

For temperature, DEQ would require a temperature management plan with adaptive management elements to address a yet-to-be-developed Total Maximum Daily Load (“TMDL”). As expected, on May 18, EPA initiated the process for establishing a TMDL for temperature in the Columbia and Lower Snake Rivers. We will be tracking this process and reporting in future posts.

For total dissolved gas, DEQ requests that EPA require the USACE to implement additional monitoring measures to increase compliance with the existing TDG TMDL through adaptive management. With regard to biocriteria, DEQ is asking USACE to allow the use of best technology available (“BTA”) or Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (“ODFW”) recommended technology to reduce fish entrainment and impingement. If the technology implemented does not reduce impingement, USACE would be required to develop an adaptive management plan and submit it to DEQ for approval. Finally, DEQ would require additional measures to reduce PCB discharges from each project to ensure compliance with Oregon toxics substances criteria.

DEQ’s objection letter is the latest development in a long-running dispute involving the effects of FCRPS operations on salmonid species listed under the Endangered Species Act (“ESA”). Oregon is an intervenor plaintiff in a lawsuit brought by the National Wildlife Federation alleging that the 2014 Biological Opinion, and later iterations, violated the ESA.

Under the Clean Water Act, EPA will now be required to hold a hearing to address DEQ’s objections and requests. By extending its section 401 authority to the FCRPS saga, DEQ has raised the bar for the seemingly endless tension between the benefits and consequences of this massive public power system, which was established in an era preceding our organic conservation statutes. It has been a bumpy ride and will continue to be for the foreseeable future.

Modern Day Alchemy: New Help for Treating Acid Mine Drainage

Posted on March 11, 2020 by Robert Uram

Two promising new technologies—recovery of rare earths from acid mine drainage (AMD and conversion of AMD treatment by-products to paint pigments are bringing new hope to remediating AMD polluted streams. These technologies are a kind of modern day alchemy—restoring streams that are orange and lifeless by turning pollution into economically valuable products and creating new jobs for local economies. The development of economically viable treatment processes is a game changer for AMD treatment with potentially huge benefits for national security, local economies, and restoration of the health of thousands of miles of now lifeless streams.

Rare Earth Recovery

West Virginia University’s Water Research Institute director, Paul Ziemkiewicz, PhD, has been at the forefront of researching AMD issues and developing AMD remediation techniques for decades. Dr. Ziemkewicz has developed a process that can extract rare earths from AMD.  As explained more fully in Rare Earths Funded, last fall he received a 5 million dollar grant from the Department of Energy to build a pilot plant in conjunction with the WVDEP that will extract rare earths while treating 500 gallons of AMD per minute. Dr. Ziemkewicz estimates that AMD flows could be the source of as much as 2200 tons of rare earths a year.

Rare earths are a critical component in many products including cell phones.  Rare Earths Funded explains that, “Rare earth metals consist of the 17 chemically similar elements at the bottom of the periodic table, such as cerium and scandium. Despite their name, they're not "rare" because they're often found in other minerals, within the earth's crust or, in this case, in coal and coal byproducts.” Most of the 20,000 tons of rare earths we use are imported, mainly from China. The initial plant will be located on Abrams Creek, a tributary to the North Branch of the Potomac River and will benefit at least 17 miles of stream.

Paint Pigments

Rural Action is a watershed organization that has been involved in restoring AMD damaged streams since 1991. Recently, they have partnered with Ohio University Professor Guy Riefler, and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources to develop a process that transforms iron from AMD into marketable paint pigments in a process called True Pigments, https://www.ohio.edu/news/2019/12/acid-mine-drainage-cleanup-plant-moves-closer-full-scale-thanks-3-5m-award. They have received a 3.5 million dollar grant from the OSMRE to partially fund the development of a treatment plant. The initial plant will treat a large discharge in the Sunday Creek watershed in Athens County, Ohio, that pollutes a seven-mile stretch of Sunday Creek with 2.2 million pounds of iron each year.

The True Pigments process treats polluted water, removing iron oxide, to yield a commercial grade of iron pigment, which can be used in paint production. The United States uses about 224,000 tons of paint pigment each year, most of which is imported from China.  The first True Pigments plant is anticipated to meet one percent of that supply.  Rural Action is still seeking an additional four million dollars needed to build the treatment facility.

In the past 25 years, with the active support of dozens of watershed groups like Rural Action and Friends of the Cheat River in West Virginia and state and federal agencies, hundreds of projects have been implemented and many hundred miles of AMD-polluted streams have been brought back to life. Formerly dead streams are now brimming with fish and other aquatic species. Local communities have the benefit of clean water.

The bulk of the funding for these restoration projects has come in the form of grants to State Abandoned Mine land programs from Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act’s Abandoned Mined Land Fund and from EPA’s Clean Water Act Section 319 grant program. These funding sources are simply insufficient to address the vast scope of AMD problems (which are only a part of the overall need to address the health and safety and other environmental effects from abandoned coal mines).  In addition, new revenue to the Abandoned Mined Land fund is currently scheduled to expire in 2021.

The rare earth and True Pigment processes can help address the funding shortage by providing an additional, independent source of funding for AMD remediation. They will be important tools in the decades to come as the battle continues to restore more than 7000 miles of streams polluted by AMD from abandoned coal mines continues in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee and Alabama.

Little Bear Run, Pennsylvania (Before and after Treatment)

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The PFAS Battle Heats Up In The Northeast?

Posted on January 27, 2020 by Barry Needleman

New Hampshire, like many northeast states, is pursuing a concerted regulatory and litigation approach to address contamination from emerging contaminants in the so-called PFAS suite of chemicals, (per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances).  Over the last few years, the State has enforced cleanups at certain manufacturing facilities, and required the provision of alternative water supplies in several communities.  Early in 2019, it began a rare, statutorily required rulemaking process to set drinking water and ambient groundwater quality rules for four chemicals - PFOA, PFOS, PFHxS and PFNA.  The new rules were approved in July 2019.

In late May 2019, New Hampshire also filed suit against the manufacturers of AFFF, the firefighting foam used at military bases, airports and fire training facilities.  This case was transferred to the AFFF multi-district litigation in South Carolina.  In a separate case, the State sued 3M, Dupont and Chemours for alleged investigation and clean-up costs incurred under the parens patriae theory, among other claims.  That case is in the initial stages of litigation.

Several plaintiffs (3M Company, a town water and sewer district, a sewage sludge disposal company and a farmer) challenged the new regulatory limits in Court.  In October 2019, the court ruled that the State had failed to perform an adequate cost/benefit analysis as required by statute.  Plymouth Village Water & Sewer District v. Scott, No. 217-2019-CV-00650, (N.H. Super. Ct., Nov.26, 2019). The final rules set standards that were 50-80% lower than the initially proposed limits, and the costs had increased by 1200%.  The State conceded it could not determine the benefits from the lower limits.  Consequently, the court issued a preliminary injunction, enjoining New Hampshire’s drinking water and groundwater quality limits.  The parties are preparing interlocutory appeals to the New Hampshire Supreme Court.  The case presents issues of first impression in New Hampshire, under its rulemaking statute and certain constitutional provisions limiting unfunded State mandates. 

ORSANCO ADDS FLEXIBILITY TO OHIO RIVER WATER QUALITY PROGRAM

Posted on November 26, 2019 by David Flannery

In an earlier blog, I raised the question of “When Should A Regulatory Program Be Eliminated”. After a four-year effort, three public comment periods, four hearings and six webinars, the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO – the interstate compact that regulates the water quality of the Ohio River) acted in June 2019 to answer this question. ORSANCO did so by revising its Pollution Control Standards to make it clear that while its Ohio River numerical water quality criteria would remain in place, the designated use for the Ohio River established by the ORSANCO Compact would be the primary mechanism by which ORSANCO would protect the quality of the Ohio River. 

In explaining the significance of its decision to leave its numerical water quality criteria on-the-books, ORSANCO offered the following sentence making it clear that its standards were to be considered by member states but were not mandatory:

The standards were adopted by the Commission for use or consideration by signatory States as they develop and implement their programs to assure that those designated uses and other goals regarding pollution control and prevention set forth in the Compact will be achieved. Emphasis added.

At its meeting in October 2019, ORSANCO adopted the process by which it would assess the consistency of the state-issued NPDES permits with its revised Pollution Control Standards.  Under that review process, ORSANCO’s staff will review the conditions on permits issued by member states and will compare those permit conditions to what they would have been had the ORSANCO numerical water quality criteria been applied.  If the state-issued permit contains any less stringent conditions, the state will be given the opportunity to explain how the terms of its permit would protect the designated uses of the Ohio River established by its Compact.

In short, while the ORSANCO numerical water quality criteria will continue to be available for “consideration” by States, the only mandatory duty imposed on the member states is the issuance of permits that are protective of the designated uses that the ORSANCO Compact has assigned to the Ohio River. 

What’s on the Menu: Trout or Shark?

Posted on May 21, 2019 by Kathy Beckett

In 2015, EPA published its final updated ambient water quality criteria for the protection of human health for 94 chemical pollutants.  This updated suite of recommendations was designed to reflect the latest scientific information and EPA policies, including updated body weight, drinking water consumption rate, fish consumption rate (“FCR”), bioaccumulation factors, health toxicity values, and relative source contributions.  Presently states and tribes are engaged in the triennial review process for the adoption of the new EPA recommended criteria.  As a result of the myriad of factors that comprise the calculation for the new recommended human health criteria, states and tribes are engaged in assessment of the particulars.  Stated simply:  AWQC (ug/l) = toxicity value (mg/kg-d) x BW (kg) x 1,000 (ug/mg)b divided by [DI (L/d) – Ʃ4 i=2 (FCRi(kg/d) x BAFi (L/kg))]. 

One notable effort to manage EPA’s fish consumption-based recommendations is found within the Idaho water quality standards setting continuum.  In 2012, EPA disapproved Idaho’s assumptions asserting that it failed to demonstrate that the criteria protected Idaho’s designated uses. Specifically, EPA concluded that Idaho failed to consider available local and regional fish consumption information suggesting that fish consumption among some Idaho population groups was greater than 17.5 g/day. EPA’s review of available information suggested that recreational anglers and subsistence fishers in Idaho consume fish at rates higher than the national default rate. In addition, during tribal consultation EPA heard from several tribes that rely on fish and other resources in Idaho waters for subsistence purposes. In its disapproval action, EPA recommended that Idaho further evaluate levels of fish intake by recreational and subsistence fishers in Idaho when evaluating the appropriate FCR for use in deriving criteria.  In 2017, EPA informed Idaho that it had not adequately taken into consideration subsistence fishing use by Idaho tribes, and therefore Idaho’s criteria were not sufficiently protective.  To make a long technical story short, after committed efforts by Idaho, EPA finally approved the state’s new and revised human health criteria, in April, 2019.

Other states and tribes are moving cautiously relative to these new human health criteria, learning from Idaho that national default assumptions embedded in EPA’s formula will require careful study.  EPA developed chemical specific science documents for each of the 94 chemical pollutants which serve to update exposure inputs for the formula cited above, many of which reference proprietary studies that are not readily available for review without purchase.  States and tribes are now working to assess EPA default values relative to local and regional data for:  body weight; drinking water consumption; fish consumption; trophic levels of fish in local waters and in representative diet; and toxicity values for non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic effects. 

The West Virginia legislature recently directed the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection to allow additional time to complete the assessment of local and regional data that is being developed prior to finalizing its water quality standards incorporating the 2015 human health criteria.  In West Virginia, freshwater trout is sought after as a culinary delicacy.  As for shark, that’s not typically on the menu.

Did a Bureaucratic Fog Envelop the Flint Water Crisis?

Posted on April 23, 2019 by Ronald R. Janke

The Flint water crisis began in April 2014 when the City of Flint switched its source of drinking water from Lake Huron to the Flint River without installing corrosion control treatment to protect against lead and other chemicals leaching from pipes into tap water.  The need for corrective action was elevated on September 24, 2015, when a Flint pediatrician, Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, released her finding that the number of young children with elevated blood lead levels had increased 90 percent after the Flint’s water supply was switched.  In her book, What the Eyes Don’t See (2018), Dr. Hanna-Attisha plaintively and repeatedly asks why the regulators didn’t do something earlier to protect the children, noting “It was their job.” 

The US EPA’s Office of Inspector General (“OIG”) addressed Dr. Hanna-Attisha’s question in two reports released in 2016 and 2018.  The 2016 report concludes that by June 2015 “EPA Region V had sufficient information and authority to issue an Emergency Order but did not.”  The Region V Administrator did issue an Emergency Administrative Order under the Safe Drinking Water Act to the State of Michigan, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) and the City of Flint on January 16, 2016, one day after President Obama declared a federal state of emergency for the City of Flint, and three months after Flint had switched to a source of water with corrosion control treatment.

The 2018 OIG report concludes that “Management Weaknesses Delayed Response to the Flint Water Crisis.” It blamed ineffective communications, ineffective assessment of risk, confused oversight roles, and a failure to use existing authority. The report recommended that EPA “strengthen its oversight of state drinking water programs to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the agency’s response to drinking water contamination emergencies.”  Notably, the report did not find that the delayed federal response resulted from factors that are commonly blamed when federal agencies fail to act – lack of authority, standards, money, personnel or other resources.   Existing personnel ultimately issued an emergency order under long-existing legal authority.   The cause of the problem and the risk of ingesting lead were recognizable -- Dr. Hanna-Attisha was immediately apprehensive about lead ingestion when a former EPA employee told her that Flint's water lacked corrosion control treatment.  Lack of concern for environmental justice seems absent, as the Obama EPA Administration widely publicized protecting low-income and minority communities, like Flint, from toxic contamination to be an agency priority.

Rather, the OIG reports suggest the Flint water crisis was enveloped in a bureaucratic fog which prevented EPA employees from seeing the urgency of the problem with enough clarity to take prompt and effective corrective action.  The fog included patterns of unfruitful extended inter- and intra-agency and inter-governmental discussions, deference, disagreements and indecision.  For example, in February 2015 EPA received six-months of lead monitoring data in which the 90th percentile of results exceeded the Practical Quantitation Limit (PQL), which by rule required Flint to optimize corrosion control treatment.  At the same time, EPA was concerned that Flint’s lead sampling protocol was biasing lead results lower.  In April 2015 EPA learned that Flint did not have corrosion control treatment in place.  In July 2015 EPA informed MDEQ that Flint had been required to provide corrosion control treatment, and the Region V Administrator advised Flint’s Mayor that EPA would “work with” the City on lead issues.  Two weeks later, EPA received a second six-months of drinking water monitoring data revealing even higher lead levels.  With MDEQ disputing that corrosion control treatment was required at Flint, Region V agreed in August 2015 to request a legal opinion from the EPA Office of Water, but it did not submit an official request until September 30, 2015.  In response, the Office of Water, without mentioning Flint, issued not a legal opinion, but a guidance memo in November 2015.  On several occasions in September 2015, the Region V administrator contacted the MDEQ, the Mayor of Flint, the EPA Administrator, and the EPA Office of Research and Development urging a variety of protective actions.   

This bureaucratic fog also contributed to EPA’s inability to react to citizen complaints about the Flint water supply.   Between May 2014 and January 2016 when the EPA Emergency Administrative Order was issued, EPA Region V received 87 complaints about Flint drinking water conditions, 30 of which raised concerns about lead.  Generally, EPA staff responded to these lead complaints with form letters recommending that citizens contact the MDEQ or the Flint water department.  Six responses took over a year to issue, and the OIG found no response to 11 lead complaints.  Region V staff did not see these complaints as indicative of a problem in Flint, and certainly not a pressing one.  In sum, the bureaucratic fog that impaired the federal response to the Flint water crisis is noteworthy not just in the context of how EPA operates but also as to the broader contemporary concern over the existence of a Deep State that subjugates public concerns to its own needs, processes and schedules.

The New Mexico Supreme Court Holds that the Copper Mine Remediation Rule is Consistent with the Water Quality Act

Posted on September 24, 2018 by Thomas Hnasko

Since 2013, when the New Mexico Water Quality Control Commission (“WQCC”) enacted the most comprehensive Copper Mine remediation rule in the country, the Attorney General and various NGOs have continued to challenge the rule because it established, on an industry-wide basis instead of through a case-by-case determination, “foreseeable places of [groundwater] withdrawal” at mine sites that are protected from contamination under the New Mexico Water Quality Act.  Initially, the Court of Appeals rejected the Attorney General’s challenges in Gila Resource Information Project v. N.M. Water Quality Control Comm’n, 2015-NMCA-076, 355 P.3d 36, holding that the determination of a protectable “place of withdrawal” has always been and remains a matter committed to the Commission’s discretion.  The Supreme Court granted certiorari to consider the question, and has now reaffirmed the Court of Appeals’ decision, but did so focusing on language directly from the Water Quality Act itself, rather than relying on the Commission’s discretion.

In Gila Resources Information Project v. N.M. Water Quality Control Comm’n, 2018-NMSC-025, 417 P.3d 369, the Attorney General repeated the argument that the Copper Rule allegedly failed to protect foreseeable places of withdrawal at mine sites because it allowed the placement of monitoring wells – at which water quality standards would be measured – to be located outside of open pits, waste stockpiles, or other active mining units.  According to the Attorney General, this placement of monitoring wells necessarily ignored the existence of protectable groundwater within the confines of those wells.  As such, the Copper Rule violated the Water Quality Act’s proscription against issuing permits for any mining facility that contaminated groundwater at “foreseeable places of withdrawal.”

Not so, said the New Mexico Supreme Court.  If the Water Quality Act prohibited water contaminants in excess of applicable standards at the location of any “discharge,” the Court reasoned that petitioners may be correct.  However, the statute itself provides that groundwater quality “shall be measured” at “foreseeable places of withdrawal.”  The Court accepted respondent’s interpretation as the “most sensible reading” of this requirement, concluding that the “shall be measured” language implies that groundwater must actually be brought to the surface for analysis and measurement.  Of course, the normal method for bringing water to the surface is through samples collected from a monitoring well.  The Court found that the measurement of groundwater quality “at any place of withdrawal” means that the New Mexico Environment Department, when acting on a permit, must select specific locations for the placement of those monitoring wells.  According to the rule, those locations must be as close “as practicable” to the open pits, waste piles and active mine units.

Thus, based on the practical consideration that groundwater quality must be measured for compliance with standards at a monitoring well, the Court relied on statutory construction, rather than on the discretion afforded to the WQCC, to hold that the Copper Rule develops a sensible procedure to protect groundwater at foreseeable places of withdrawal.  In this regard, the Supreme Court’s decision departed from the Court of Appeals’ analysis and upheld a comprehensive copper mine remediation rule that will likely be followed by other copper-producing jurisdictions.

When Should A Regulatory Program Be Eliminated?

Posted on August 9, 2018 by David Flannery

It is certainly not unusual for regulatory agencies implementing water quality standard programs to conduct periodic reviews of the appropriateness of those programs.  Such has been the case with the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (“ORSANCO”) for many years. In connection with the current triennial review of its Pollution Control Standards, ORSANCO recently offered the following statement in a public notice and request for comment

This review of the Pollution Control Standards differs from past reviews in that it asks your input on whether ORSANCO should continue to maintain, administer, and periodically update the current Pollution Control Standards, or should eliminate the Pollution Control Standards and withdraw from the process of maintaining and updating such standards.

The proposal to eliminate this regulatory program was undertaken by ORSANCO following a multi-year comprehensive assessment of ORSANCO’s function and role in partnership with its member states, USEPA, and the many other water quality protection activities that are currently administered to protect the Ohio River. This review caused ORSANCO to reach the conclusion “that all member states are implementing approved programs under the federal Clean Water Act” and that “there appears to be little or no purpose for the Commission to continue the triennial review process of updating the PCS rules.” ORSANCO also concluded that elimination of its regulatory program was being proposed with full confidence that the public would have “the full and complete protection of the federal Clean Water Act and the oversight of USEPA and the states without the redundancy of the current PCS program”. http://www.orsanco.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Preferred-Expanded-Alternative-2-and-Minority-Report.pdf   

ORSANCO is seeking comment on this proposal through August 20, 2018. Details of the proposal and the public comment process can be found on the ORSANCO web site.  I am sure that ORSANCO would be very interested in hearing from any of you that have a comment on the proposal or any thoughts on the title question about when a regulatory program should be eliminated.

 ORSANCO is an interstate compact whose member states include Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia.  The Compact forming ORSANCO was signed in 1948 following the consent of the United States Congress and enactment of the Compact into law by the legislatures of the eight member states.

Strong Headwinds Face Water Quality Trading in the Chesapeake

Posted on August 2, 2018 by Ridgway Hall

The Chesapeake Bay watershed covers 64,000 square miles in parts of Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New York, West Virginia and the District of Columbia. When the six states and the District asked EPA to establish a multi-state Total Maximum Daily Load under the Clean Water Act in 2010 and assign each state its fair share, they took on the job of reducing discharges of nitrogen from all sources by 25%, phosphorus by 24% and sediment by 10%. The goal is to have all necessary measures in place to achieve this by 2025 to meet applicable water quality standards. With funding at the state and federal levels in short supply, a search was on for the most cost-effective ways to reduce these pollutants.  The states with the biggest burdens, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Maryland, each turned to the emerging practice of water quality trading.

Trading enables a discharger for whom the cost per unit of pollution reduction is lower than for other dischargers to reduce its pollution below what the law requires and sell that extra reduction as a “credit” to another discharger for whom the cost per unit of pollutant reduction is greater.  The result is that the seller makes money from the credit sale, and the buyer attains compliance at a lower cost than it would otherwise incur. Sounds simple, doesn’t it?  In October the Government Accounting Office published the results of a nationwide survey in which it found that only 11 states have water quality trading programs, and the only significant use being made was in Pennsylvania, Virginia and Connecticut, even though EPA has been promoting it since 1996. (I discussed this in “Water Quality: Wading into Trading” posted Nov. 28, 2017).

To encourage the Bay states to adopt trading programs that will comply with the Clean Water Act and its implementing regulations, EPA published a series of “Technical Memoranda” (TMs) addressing key elements of a trading program including “baseline” (the maximum amount of pollution allowed under any applicable law before a credit can be generated), protecting local water quality where a credit is used, credit calculation, and accounting for uncertainty. This is needed where a nonpoint source, like a farm, is generating credits by installation of best management practices (BMPs) and the pollution reduction benefits must be estimated using modeling. The TMs also address credit duration, certification by the agency, registration and tracking on a publicly posted registry, and verification that the BMPs on which the credits are based are being maintained.  Finally, they address sampling and public participation. (See my blog post of Sept. 26, 2016 “New Tools for Water Quality Trading”).  Credits can also be used to “offset” new or expanded discharges. The TMs are not regulations, but set forth EPA’s “expectations”.

Common Elements

Pennsylvania, Virginia and Maryland have adopted trading regulations which are intended to be consistent with the TMs.  The principal elements include . . . [CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE]

DAVID AND GOLIATH AT THE CONOWINGO DAM

Posted on June 26, 2018 by Ridgway Hall

Exelon owns and operates the Conowingo Dam across the Susquehanna River in Maryland just below the Pennsylvania border, including a 573 megawatt hydroelectric power plant. It is seeking a renewal of its operating license from FERC under the Federal Power Act for 50 years. Section 401 of the Clean Water Act requires that any applicant for a federal license that may result in a discharge submit a certification by the state where the discharge will occur that the discharge “will comply with the applicable provisions” of the CWA, including water quality standards. The certification may include conditions and requirements, including monitoring and reporting, deemed necessary to ensure compliance. The certification becomes part of the federal license, and the licensing agency may not change it.

The facts in this case are unusual, and the outcome will likely be precedential. For decades, sediment has flowed down the 450 miles of the Susquehanna River from New York and Pennsylvania and accumulated in the reservoir behind the dam, trapping nitrogen, phosphorus, metals, PCBs and other pollutants along with the sediment,  Now the trapping capacity has been reached. Several times in recent decades severe storms have scoured out tons of this sediment and carried it over the dam and into the Chesapeake Bay 10 miles downstream, causing not just violation of water quality standards, but severe damage to oysters, bay grasses and benthic organisms.  In addition, the dam has blocked historic fish passage. Measures such as fish ladders and transportation have produced only modest relief. Since 2010 the entire Chesapeake Bay and its tributary system has been subject to a multi-state total maximum daily load (TMDL) for nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment, but at the time that was set, it was not anticipated that the Conowingo trapping capacity would be exhausted this soon.

On April 27, 2018, the Maryland Department of the Environment issued a CWA certification in which it determined that numerous conditions must be complied with by Exelon in order to reasonably ensure compliance with water quality standards. It requires, among other things, measures to ensure compliance with standards for dissolved oxygen (DO), chlorophyll-A (an indicator of algae), turbidity, temperature, pH and bacteriological criteria in the reservoir and downstream waters including the Bay, plus compliance with plans to protect various fish species, waterfowl and habitat. It also requires shoreline protection, removal of trash from the reservoir and a variety of monitoring programs.

Notably, to satisfy the DO standards, which are adversely affected by nutrients and are critical to aquatic life, MDE requires that starting in 2025 Exelon must annually reduce the amount of nitrogen in its discharges by 6 million pounds, and phosphorus by 260,000 pounds. Exelon can also satisfy this requirement by installing best management practices elsewhere upstream or paying $17 per pound of nitrogen and $270 per pound of phosphorus for any amounts not removed.

Exelon promptly filed a request for reconsideration and administrative appeal with MDE. It also filed a complaint in Maryland state court seeking a declaration that the certification could not be considered “final action” until proceedings before MDE were concluded, including Exelon’s right to an evidentiary hearing; an injunction against any consideration of the certification by FERC, and, alternatively, for judicial review. Exelon also filed suit in the U.S District Court in Washington, D.C., claiming that MDE’s certification exceeded its CWA authority and constituted an unconstitutional taking of its property, and seeking declaratory and injunctive relief.  See Exelon’s filings at here.

Among Exelon’s complaints is the fact that the certification would require it to spend vast sums to remove pollutants that did not come from its operations, but from upstream polluters. The fee equivalent of the nitrogen and phosphorus removals would amount to $172 million per year – far more than Exelon earns from the operation of Conowingo. An environmental impact statement had concluded that efforts to remove the sediment from behind the dam “would be cost-prohibitive and ineffective.” Releases from the dam, Exelon contends, are not “discharges” but “pass-through.” Exelon also argues that fish passage damage was caused decades ago and it would be unfair to make Exelon bear the full cost of restoring it.

Some environmental groups have joined the administrative appeal process.  Stewards of the Lower Susquehanna and Waterkeepers Chesapeake (a group of 18 Waterkeeper organizations in the Chesapeake Bay watershed) appealed to MDE asking that protection against scouring by big storms be strengthened and that likely effects from climate change be considered, but otherwise supporting the certification. The Nature Conservancy and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, both with longstanding interests in water quality and restoration of the fisheries and fish passage, have also been actively involved.

The stakes are high. MDE, “David” in my title, has taken some bold measures to address some enormous problems, and Exelon is fighting back hard. However it comes out, the resolution will have precedential value for other CWA 401 cases across the country, and particularly for hydroelectric projects.

Big Tribal Victory in Culvert Case, Big Implications for Taxpayers

Posted on June 13, 2018 by Rick Glick

On June 11, the Supreme Court issued a one-sentence order affirming the Ninth Circuit’s 2016 judgment in United States v. State of Washington. In that case, the government sued Washington on behalf of several Indian tribes, asserting that culverts constructed by the state over decades blocked salmon runs for which the tribes held treaty fishing rights. The Court of Appeals ordered Washington to repair or replace the offending culverts. The Supreme Court split 4-4, with Justice Kennedy recusing himself, which allows the Ninth Circuit ruling to stand.

The ruling is a major victory for Indian treaty rights. The historical tradeoff for acceding to white settlement throughout the West was preservation of hunting and fishing rights dating from time immemorial. These rights were to ensure tribal sustenance and to preserve religious and cultural practices. The Court of Appeals held that inherent in fishing rights is a duty to maintain viable salmon habitat and migration corridors.

The justice for the tribes in the outcome cannot be denied. However, compliance with the ruling carries an enormous price tag, in the many billions of dollars. Further, culverts aren’t the only sources of degradation of salmon habitat. Settlement of the West entailed construction of hundreds of dams and other stream obstructions. More than a century of agriculture, mining and industrial activities have denuded riparian zones, straightened meandering streams, filled spawning gravels with sediments, and added nutrients and other pollutants to waterways. Most, if not all, streams listed by Western states as water quality impaired under Clean Water Act section 303(d), are on the list for temperature, suspended solids, dissolved oxygen and other pollutants related to development.

A great deal of litigation and regulatory activity is ongoing to address these concerns, but does the U.S. v. Washington case add the potential for accelerated court mandated corrections? How will state and local government budgets cope with aggressive timelines for compliance? Will the Administration and Congress step up to help?

The latter question raises justice issues of its own. Washington argued that the culverts it installed were in accordance with federal designs. In a statement, state Attorney General Bob Ferguson said, "It is unfortunate that Washington state taxpayers will be shouldering all the responsibility for the federal government's faulty culvert design."

Interestingly, other Washington State officials do not appear to share AG Ferguson’s sense of outrage. As reported in the New York Times, Gov. Jay Inslee and Public Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz did not support petitioning the Supreme Court for review: "For some time now I've hoped that instead of litigation we could focus together on our ongoing work to restore salmon habitat," Inslee said. Franz added, "It is time to stop fighting over who should do what." And indeed, the state has been actively working on the culverts.

The courts were not moved by Ferguson’s argument that the federal government is to blame for bad culvert design. Still, it does seem that the issue of salmon habitat restoration is not for Washington State to resolve by itself, but is a national problem resulting in significant part from national policies, and thus requires a national solution.

Water Quality: Wading Into Trading

Posted on November 28, 2017 by Ridgway Hall

For over 20 years EPA has been promoting water quality trading – with particular emphasis on nutrients and sediment – as a way to improve water quality at reduced costs. Trading is based on the simple proposition that if Party A can reduce a pollutant at a lower per-unit cost than Party B, who needs to reduce its discharges of that pollutant, it is more economically efficient for Party A to reduce its discharges below what is required by law, and sell the additional reduction, or “credit”, to Party B. If the price is less than what Party B would otherwise pay and more than it costs Party A to make the reduction, B will save money and A will make money. 

The focus is on nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment because these pollutants have for many years been leading causes of water quality impairment and, in the case of nutrients, adverse effects on human health when the resulting algae blooms release toxins and harmful bacteria.  In 2016 EPA reported that nutrient-caused algae blooms were on the rise, causing fish kills, contamination of fish and shellfish, and beach closures, resulting in significant damage to local economies and impairments to human health. The biggest source of these pollutants is farming operations. Trading seems especially well-suited to help reduce polluted runoff from farms because their per unit cost of removing nutrients is far lower than for wastewater treatment plants. Finally, because farm runoff is a nonpoint discharge, it is not regulated under the Clean Water Act. Regulation is left to states. While many states require farms to have nutrient management plans, because the states have limited resources to inspect and enforce, finding incentives to stimulate a market-driven solution has obvious appeal.

So why are there so few trading programs in place? The GAO attempted to find the answers in its report Water Pollution: Some States Have Trading Programs to Help Address Nutrient Pollution, but Use Has Been Limited (October 2017). The report addresses (1) the extent to which nutrient trading programs are being used, (2) how EPA and the states oversee these programs, and (3) what factors affect participation in trading.  As of 2014, eleven states had some form of trading programs: California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Virginia. Most of the trading was being done in Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Virginia, so GAO focused primarily on these programs.

All three of these states established their trading programs through legislation and implementing regulations. All three allow point-source to point-source trading, but as of 2014 only Pennsylvania allowed non-point sources to generate credits. Virginia appears to be moving in that direction through pending regulatory amendments.  Connecticut uses a general permit that allows 79 point sources in the Long Island Sound watershed to trade nitrogen credits through a Nitrogen Credit Exchange Program. Each year plants that are not meeting their discharge limits can buy credits from plants who are below their required limits.

Virginia allows trading of nitrogen and phosphorus credits between point sources.  Most but not all sales are through a Nutrient Credit Exchange Association, which is privately run in consultation with the state, and provides tracking of credit generation and sales.  Pennsylvania allows a point source to buy credits generated by nonpoint and point source dischargers. It has a credit exchange, PENNVEST, but most trades are outside it.  The state keeps a registry of credits generated, sold and used. During 2014, there were 39 trades in Connecticut, 151 in Pennsylvania, and 31 in Virginia.

Trading programs are managed by the states, with oversight by EPA to be sure that both the elements of the trading program and individual permits that incorporate trades comply with the Clean Water Act. Those who buy credits said that the benefits of doing so include reduced cost of compliance, risk management (credits can be used to address plant failures which cause noncompliance), and flexibility in timing technology upgrades. 

GAO cites two primary disincentives to trading. First, if water quality criteria are written in narrative form, permits are also often written in narrative form, so it is difficult to determine whether or when use of a credit might be helpful. While EPA has been pressing states to adopt numerical criteria for nutrients, GAO reported that as of 2017 only 6 states had them.  I believe that this problem can be mitigated by including numerical water-quality based effluent limits (WQBELS) in NPDES permits even when the criteria element of a water quality standard is narrative.  I don’t know how widely this is done, but typically a total maximum daily load (TMDL), which is required for water bodies not meeting water quality standards, is expressed in numerical terms, and that provides the basis for WQBELs. GAO observed that the Ohio River Basin Interstate Water Quality Trading Project allows trading among sources in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana, but almost no trading has occurred because there are no numerical limits in the water quality standards or a TMDL.

The second reason given by stakeholders to GAO for limited trading is the difficulty in determining the water quality benefits of a best management practice (BMP), which is what is installed on farmland to reduce runoff. Models do exist for converting the benefits of BMPs, such as vegetated buffers, no-till farming and cover crops, to numerical pollution reduction on an annual basis, but these are only estimates, and lack the precision that a point source discharger looks for in deciding whether to buy a credit from a farmer. EPA has recommended the use of an “uncertainty factor”, such as 2:1, by which a buyer of 100 nitrogen credits would have to buy 200 credits. This could be modified upwards or downwards based on site-specific conditions. It is still an estimate, and any trading program will need to apply a dose of adaptive management if it wants nonpoint source trading to get up and running.  The potential cost savings are sufficiently great that such an uncertainty ratio would not by itself, in most cases, discourage trading.

Several other factors, not discussed by GAO, also tend to discourage nonpoint source trading. There is the uncertainty of the buyer, who will rely on the credit to meet its NPDES permit terms: what if the BMP on which the credit is based fails? This is a particular concern for public utilities, whose managers and ratepayers may not want the utility relying for compliance on a set of BMPs over which the utility has no control. On the farmer side, what if the farmer invests substantial sums in BMPs to generate credits, but there turns out to be little or no market for them? Several states and some financing institutions are exploring ways to create a market to jump start the process, and we will likely see more on that. Finally, there is an inherent reluctance to be among the first in what is still largely an experimental program – especially if it is being run by a government agency.

It is no coincidence that two of the three most active programs, Pennsylvania and Virginia, are in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, where a numerical multi-state TMDL has been in place since 2010. (That TMDL was discussed in my blog article EPA Issues Biggest TMDL Ever for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, posted March 4, 2011.) At this writing Maryland, also in the Chesapeake watershed, is developing a trading program which will include nonpoint source trading and will be run jointly by the Maryland Departments of Environment and Agriculture.  The only way the goals of the Chesapeake TMDL will be achieved is through major reductions of the nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment released by farms. In a future post, I will explore those three programs in more detail.

Cooperative Federalism – 1; State Defendants in the Flint Water Crisis – 0

Posted on September 26, 2017 by Jeffrey Haynes

In a case of first impression, a divided Sixth Circuit held that the state agency defendants in the Flint water crisis cannot remove state-law tort claims against them under the federal officer removal statute.  Mays v. City of Flint, No. 16-2484 (Sixth Cir., Sept.11, 2017).  The ruling affirmed a remand to the Genesee County Circuit Court, where, the court acknowledged—emphasizing the obvious—the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality staffers are likely to be “unpopular figures.”

Residents of Flint sued, among others, several present and former MDEQ staff members for gross negligence, fraud, assault and battery, and intentional infliction of emotional distress, based upon MDEQ’s failure to control corrosion of aging water pipes, which caused lead to leach into Flint’s water supply.  The MDEQ defendants removed the action under the federal officer removal statute, 42 U.S.C. §1442(a)(1), which allows “any officer (or person acting under that officer) of the United States” to remove a state-law action to federal court.  The purpose of the statute is to insulate federal officers from local bias against unpopular federal laws.  Examples of customs agents in the War of 1812, revenue agents during Prohibition, and border agents come to mind.  The MDEQ defendants argued they were enforcing the Safe Drinking Water Act for USEPA, and therefore were acting under federal officers.

The court held that the MDEQ was enforcing Michigan law under a delegation of federal authority voluntarily accepted by the state.  The state officers were not contractors, employees, or agents of federal officers.  The cooperative federalism of the SDWA was more like a partnership than a principal-agent relationship.  EPA oversight, reporting requirements, and federal funding were not enough to bring the MDEQ defendants within the removal statute.  The dissent believed, on the other hand, that the state agency defendants’ removal petition satisfied their burden of demonstrating that their actions brought them under the statute’s protection. 

The court kept the floodgates closed.  It noted that many other environmental statutes come within the cooperative federalism model, and that allowing removal would cause garden-variety state-law tort claims against state officers for enforcing state law to be litigated in federal courts.

So, states’ rights advocates, take heart.  Even though your state enforces federal environmental standards with federal funds and oversight, you are on your own.  Regardless of citizen anger with the distant federal government, your state officials can still be tried by local jurors angry with your state government.

THE CUYAHOGA RIVER MAKES NEWS AGAIN: A POSTSCRIPT

Posted on May 31, 2017 by Michael Hardy

On May 11, 2017, I published a blog piece about the efforts of the Army Corps of Engineers to circumvent the State of Ohio’s “anti-degradation” water quality rules for the disposal of contaminated sediments from portions of the Cleveland Harbor and Shipping Channel.  Instead of dry land disposal in Confined Disposal Facilities (“CDF”), the Corp cited its own “Federal Standard” that justified, in its view, “open lake disposal” in Lake Erie at considerable cost savings.  The United States District Court ruled on May 5, 2017 that action was “arbitrary and capricious” under the Administrative Procedure Act.  The District Court showed no deference to the Corp’s “scientific” efforts to create its own rules in contravention to Ohio’s water quality standards.

The controversy arose in the context of the disposal of the contaminated sediments in the shipping channel of the Cuyahoga River, which makes up the last six miles of the River ( the northern end spilling into Lake Erie).  The River travels approximately 85 miles in total and drains nearly 815 square miles in four counties.  Just several miles south of the shipping channel is the 33,000 square acre Cuyahoga Valley National Park, with a number of significant tributaries feeding the River.  These upstream waters provide significant sand and gravel loadings to the northern reach of the River.

Recognizing that it could not afford to build a new $150,000,000 CFD, the Port of Cleveland looked for ways to reduce the sediment loading upstream of the navigation channel.  Adapting innovative “green” technology, the first of its kind at a port like Cleveland’s, the Port installed a “bed load interceptor” machine in the water about five miles upstream of the Shipping Channel that captures the sediment and extracts the clean sand for disposal into onsite piles.  With less sediment coming downriver, the Port hopes to extend the life of the existing CDF for another 30 years. The collected sand has a financial value for use in composting, construction, landscaping and road fill.  Here is a link to a recent The Plain Dealer(Cleveland.com) article that describes the technology, as well as its costs and resultant savings in dredging/disposal costs, and that depicts the process and the location of the interceptor.

The Port of Cleveland’s success with the interceptor has prompted other ports to examine the application of the technology to their locations, including a port on Lake Superior and sites in the Mississippi River delta.

The Cuyahoga River Makes News Again

Posted on May 11, 2017 by Michael Hardy

To many environmental law veterans, the name of the Cuyahoga River triggers memories.   The 1969 fire on that River galvanized major reforms to the water pollution laws of the United States.

As I sit in my 36th floor office and look out the windows in several directions, I can see most of the upper Cuyahoga River course through the “Industrial Flats” as it winds from the Cleveland Harbor north on Lake Erie to the large Arcelor Mittal steel plant nearly six miles downriver.  Known as the “crooked river” by Indian lore, it has many oxbows and switchbacks with colorful names like “Collision Bend” and “Irishtown Flats”.  Home to rowing teams, large tugs, iron ore freighters, and sand and gravel barges, it is a busy river requiring constant upkeep through dredging.

The Cuyahoga River has made remarkable progress since the 1969 fire, with many targeting the fifty-year anniversary of the fire for the removal of its “impaired” classification.  But the River still suffers from years of industrial and municipal sewage disposal.  Although a variety of fish have returned, it should not be surprising to know that slightly elevated PCBs remain in the sediments, a fact that complicates the dredging and disposal of the spoils.  Therein lies the newest chapter in the River’s history.

Congress has funded the dredging of the Cuyahoga River for nearly 40 years and, in 2015, allocated resources to the Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) for that year.  Accordingly, the Corps filed an application with the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) for a water quality certification under Section 401 of the Clean Water Act before commencement of the dredging project.  The OEPA, concerned over elevated levels of PCBs in some of the dredging spoils, authorized the dredging to proceed, provided the Corps disposed of all the dredged material in on-site “confined disposal facilities” (CDFs).  Based on sampling and analysis it conducted, the Corps agreed to utilize a CDF for the sediments dredged from the Cleveland Harbor, but objected to the required use of a CDF for the spoils coming from the “Upper Channel” of the River.  Calculating what it called a “Federal Standard” to identify less costly alternatives, the Corps proposed instead to use “open lake disposal” for those materials, which immediately drew the opposition of the OEPA and Ohio Department of Natural Resources.  The Corps argued that the use of a CDF for those spoils would add nearly $1,300,000 to the cost of the project.  The Court wanted the “Federal Standard” to override Ohio’s anti-degradation water quality rules and other initiatives designed to improve the health of Lake Erie.  Instead of an administrative appeal of the OEPA conditional certification, the Corps gave the State an ultimatum – either find a “non-federal source” for the added costs or forfeit the Congressionally authorized dredging.  Because of the potential dire economic consequences to the steel mill and other businesses, the State sued the Corps and obtained a preliminary injunction.  The District Court sided with the State and ordered the dredging to commence, with the responsibility for the incremental costs to be determined in subsequent proceedings.

On May 5, 2017, the District Court issued a 52-page Opinion finding that the Corps’ actions were “arbitrary and capricious” under the Administrative Procedure Act. State of Ohio v. The United States Army Corps of Engineers, U.S.D.C. N.D.Ohio Case No. 1:15 – CV 629.  Among other things, the Court found that the Corps’ elevation of its so-called “Federal Standard” to supersede duly promulgated water quality standards of Ohio exceeded the Corps’ authority. The Corps could not make up its own rules to evade its obligations to comply with properly adopted environmental standards or to fulfill Congressional mandates to dredge the entirety of the Cuyahoga navigation channel and use a CDF to manage the spoils.  Accordingly, the District Court ruled that the Corps must absorb the added costs of the on-land CDF disposal.

Flint litigation: an interim update

Posted on October 13, 2016 by Jeffrey Haynes

Along with the flood of news coverage of the Flint water crisis comes the flood of litigation.  So far, early indications show a wrong in search of a remedy, and for criminal defendants, just the expected plea deals.  Here are some highlights.

In April, a federal district judge dismissed for lack of subject matter jurisdiction a §1983 claim for “safe and portable water” as preempted by the Safe Drinking Water Act.  The case is on appeal.

Class actions have been filed against state and municipal officials in federal court, the Michigan Court of Claims, and Genesee County Circuit Court, seeking damages for personal injuries, property damages, and relief from water bills.  Along with the usual governmental immunity defense, defendants assert a statute of limitations defense, with a fair likelihood of success.  The governmental immunity defense is complicated by Governor Snyder admitting fault.  That admission strengthens plaintiffs’ gross negligence exception to governmental immunity.

So far, the Attorney General’s criminal charges have resulted in the usual plea deals by underlings.  The Flint water quality supervisor whom I lauded in a previous post as the only principled public servant in this mess (a position with which the Attorney General agrees) pled no contest to willful neglect of duty; the plea is essentially nothing, because the court took the plea under advisement with dismissal in one year if the supervisor cooperates with the investigation.  A state official reached a second plea deal, pleading no contest to willful neglect of duty regarding an outbreak of legionnaire’s disease with the usual cooperation clause.

Politics saturates the Flint legal landscape.  Attorney General Bill Schuette is widely expected to run for governor in 2018 and must therefore appear to be doing something, such as filing an unusual professional negligence and public nuisance claim against the Flint outside engineering firms.  And when the Flint mayor notified Michigan of intent to sue the state, the state receivership board with continuing jurisdiction over Flint removed the city’s authority to sue.

Stay tuned.

New Tools for Water Quality Trading

Posted on September 26, 2016 by Ridgway Hall

For well over a decade states and stakeholders have been trying to develop water quality trading and offset programs to facilitate compliance with the Clean Water Act.  The goal of “trading” is to allow a discharger who can cost-effectively reduce pollutants to a lower level than legally required to sell the resulting “credit” to another source whose per-unit cost of reducing that same pollutant is greater. The “credit” is the amount of reduction achieved by the credit generator beyond compliance. The result is more cost-effective compliance. 

An “offset” involves using a “credit” to offset a new or increased discharge to a water body which is not achieving water quality standards (often referred to as “impaired”) for that pollutant.  Without such an offset, any new discharge to an impaired water body is illegal, because it would exacerbate the standards violation. Typically the credit or offset is incorporated into the permit of the user, and is thereby enforceable.

Recognizing these benefits, EPA supports trading, and issued a policy and guidance memo in 2003.  One of the most promising opportunities for trading is the reduction of nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment, which are causing water quality problems across the country.  Farms typically have nonpoint source discharges of all three of these pollutants, and can reduce the volume much more cost-effectively than a municipal or industrial point source, which is the typical buyer. However, efforts to establish trading programs have run into problems, such as determining a measurable “baseline” compliance level for a nonpoint source credit generator before a credit can be generated. Nonpoint sources typically use “best management practices” (BMPs) to achieve pollution reductions representing their fair share of loading allocations for the water body to which they discharge. Before a farmer can generate a credit, his “fair share”, or baseline, must be both determined and met.

Additional problems include protecting local water quality where the credit is used, verifying the implementation of a credit, and accounting for uncertainty in the amount of pollution reduction which a BMP implemented at a non-point source will actually achieve. As a result, while many states have tried to establish such programs, including the development of regulations, very few have been successful. 

To address these problems, EPA over the past 3 years has issued 8 “technical  memoranda” (TMs) which set forth EPA’s “expectations” for the contents of an effective trading program within the Chesapeake Bay watershed. This is, in effect, a pilot.  The reason for the focus on this 64,000 square mile watershed is that in 2010 EPA published the biggest total maximum daily load (TMDL) ever issued under the CWA, which sets forth pollutant loading allocations which must be achieved throughout the watershed in order to achieve compliance with applicable water quality standards. I described this TMDL in a previous post entitled EPA Issues Biggest TMDL Ever for Chesapeake Watershed, posted on March 4, 2011. Faced with huge costs to achieve the reductions, many of the states are looking at trading.

To maximize the likelihood that such trades will be carried out in compliance with the CWA, EPA issued the TMs for use by the Bay states in designing their programs. They address baseline determination, duration of credits, components of a credit calculation, protection of local water quality, accounting for uncertainty of the water quality benefit of a BMP, representative sampling, verification and certification (including inspections and public availability of all relevant documents), and accounting for growth (including need for an “offset” program). The “credit calculation” TM addresses, among other things “additionality” (the requirement that any trade must result in a net reduction of pollution) and “leakage” (when a pollutant load reduction at one location indirectly causes an increase in pollution elsewhere). These can be accessed on EPA’s “Trading and Offsets in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed” web site. They are not regulations or even “official agency guidance” (says EPA), and do not have the force of law. They do set forth EPA’s “expectations”.  EPA officials have said that each state trading program will be reviewed for consistency with these TMs.

For those around the country who are trying to design and implement trading programs, these TMs can be enormously helpful.  They are fairly brief (typically 6 to 12 pages), clear and concise.  And who among us would not support more cost-effective reduction of pollution?

New Mexico Supreme Court to Determine if Copper Rule Prevents, Rather Than Encourages, Ground Water Pollution

Posted on September 23, 2016 by Thomas Hnasko

The New Mexico Water Quality Control Commission enacted what is arguably the most comprehensive copper mine remediation rule in the country.  The Copper Rule requires copper mines to uniformly implement prescriptive measures of pollution control and to protect ground water at “foreseeable places of withdrawal.”  But does the Copper Rule really prevent pollution, as required by the New Mexico Water Quality Act?  Not so, say the Attorney General and various NGOs, who appealed the case to the New Mexico Court of Appeals.  They claimed that the Copper Rule’s uniform monitoring criteria, which require the placement of a monitoring well network as close as practicable around the perimeter of mine units, does not sufficiently protect ground water and therefore fails to satisfy the Water Quality Act’s mandate that contaminant concentrations not exceed permissible standards at places of withdrawal.  The Court of Appeals affirmed the Commission’s rule-making in Gila Resources Information Project v. N.M. Water Quality Control Comm’n, holding that the determination of a “place of withdrawal” has always been and remains a matter committed to the Commission’s discretion. [Link to Case.] 

The New Mexico Supreme Court will now consider whether the New Mexico Water Quality Control Commission has the authority, under the Water Quality Act, to adopt the regulations imposing prescriptive pollution controls and defining by rule, rather than on a case-by-case basis, the type of monitoring controls which essentially define protectable ground water as that existing on the exterior of active mine units.  After a number of swings of the bat, the petitioners in the Supreme Court have refined their arguments. They now claim that the Water Quality Act requires a case-by-case determination of a place of withdrawal, based on particular aquifer characteristics, rather than a definition derived by rule.  To succeed with this challenge, the petitioners must overcome the legislature’s mandate, in the 2009 amendments to the Water Quality Act, that the Commission adopt uniform monitoring requirements for the entire copper industry.  The battle seems to be whether the Copper Rule is sufficiently flexible to protect all places of withdrawal – regardless of where located – or whether the rule imposes a de facto definition of a place of withdrawal based on criteria that may not be tailored specifically to the aquifer characteristics at a particular site.  Oral argument is set for September 28, 2016.

Senate Approves $4.9 Billion for Drinking Water

Posted on September 15, 2016 by Rick Glick

Congress in recent years has not really been in the business of solving core public welfare problems like safe drinking water.  Today the Senate, however, has taken a major step forward by passing the 2016 Water Resources and Development Act, S. 2848.  WRDA bills are the annual appropriations bills to shore up the nation’s water service infrastructure.  The Senate bill would provide $9.4 billion for water projects, hydrology and flood control, including $4.9 billion to address aging municipal water systems. 

By and large, Americans take for granted that their municipal water supply systems deliver abundant, wholesome and safe drinking water.  Water borne illnesses are rare in this country, and the professionals I know that operate these systems take their jobs seriously and feel the weight of the responsibility.  And yet, there are colossal failures putting public health at risk—like Flint.

The Flint debacle reflects a complete absence of professional water management.  The problem there was a change in water supply, and the failure to add commonly available corrosion inhibiting chemicals to the water to prevent lead pipelines from leaching lead into Flint homes.  What should have been an inexpensive operational measure became a billion dollar pipe replacement project.  And that figure doesn’t include the long-term costs to address health effects of drinking the water, not to mention the cost of a different kind of corrosion, that of the public trust.

But even well-managed municipal water systems, including those that tout the high quality of the supply, can have serious lead problems.   My town of Portland, Oregon, has one of the purest water sources in the country, the Bull Run water shed on Mt. Hood.  The water is so soft, however, that it has a corrosive effect.  Luckily Portland doesn’t have lead service pipes like Flint, but many older homes have lead solder in their plumbing, resulting in Portland exceeding lead drinking water standards in high risk households and schools.

The Portland Water Bureau is taking steps to address the lead problem, like raising the pH level in the water to minimize lead leaching.  But Portland’s water rates are among the highest in the country, and the cost of maintaining safe water supplies is only going up.  There is a practical limit to how high water rates can go, and communities with fewer resources than Portland struggle to keep up.

This is where the federal government is supposed to step in, to address problems that exceed local capacities to protect the public.  Although a little late in coming, S. 2848 is a mostly bipartisan bill, which if enacted could move the needle in the right direction.  Let’s hope this bill gets through the House and to the President for signing without further delay.

Wisconsin’s Multi-Discharger Variance for Phosphorus – A Progress Report

Posted on June 8, 2015 by Linda Bochert

On May 5, 2015, the Wisconsin Department of Administration (WDOA) released its Preliminary Determination that compliance with the Wisconsin water quality-based effluent limitations (WQBEL) for phosphorus will cause “substantial and widespread adverse social and economic impacts on a statewide basis”, thus providing the foundation for availability of a statewide multi-discharger variance (MDV).

What brought this on?

In posts in 2011 and 2013, I described Wisconsin’s phosphorus reduction rule, including its compliance options of water quality trading and adaptive management. Recognizing that these innovative compliance alternatives to traditional construction are not viable for all dischargers, in 2014 Wisconsin enacted legislation to authorize a statewide MDV for those dischargers that cannot meet the WQBEL for phosphorus without a major facility upgrade.  Under the MDV, a point source will have more time to meet its phosphorus limitations.  However, during the extended period, they will be obligated to either implement nonpoint source reductions or to provide funding to counties to implement existing, but seriously underfunded, nonpoint source reduction programs.  The expectation is that most permittees will choose to fund their local county.  At $50/pound for the difference between the actual pounds of phosphorus discharged and the target value of 0.2 mg/L, we are talking about real money.

The MDV legislation required the WDOA, in consultation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR), to conduct a study to:

“determine whether attaining the water quality standard for phosphorus . . . through compliance with water quality based effluent limitations by point sources that cannot achieve compliance without major facility upgrades is not feasible because it would cause substantial and widespread adverse social and economic impacts on a statewide basis.”

Based on work conducted by ARCADIS, The University of Massachusetts Donohue Institute, and Sycamore Advisors, consultants to WDOA and WDNR, the Preliminary Determination concludes that, without this variance:

·         “almost 600 Wisconsin businesses will be impacted as they continue to work their way out of the recession”

·         Wisconsin communities will experience a minimum cost of “$3.4 billion in capital expenditures which will rise to nearly $7 billion when accounting for interest” to meet increased capital costs

·         Annual operations and maintenance (O&M) cost of $405 million along with debt service will “equate to $708 million annually”

·         In 2025 when the full impact of the costs will be felt, statewide impacts will result in:

o   4,517 fewer jobs

o   $283.3 million in foregone wages

o   $616.6 million reduction in gross state product

o   11,000 fewer Wisconsin residents

A hearing on the Preliminary Determination was held on May 12, and written comments are due by June 11.  The next step is for WDNR to submit a request to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to approve the MDV for phosphorus for Wisconsin.   Once implementation of the MDV begins, much-needed nonpoint source funding can begin to flow.

Additional relevant documents are accessible via the WDNR website

Sorry, The Pollywogs Win and Your Crops Lose

Posted on February 3, 2015 by James Palmer Jr.

Lawyers who regularly practice in the realm of the Clean Water Act (the “Act”) well know that the fight causing the most widespread panic in the regulated community for many months has been the joint proposal by EPA and the Corps of Engineers to amend the definition of “Waters of the United States.”  Even though the agencies jointly withdrew the proposal on January 29, 2015, water lawyers and their clients shouldn’t let their guards down, because another inevitable regulatory slugfest is coming, and it will be over water use. 

In its original form in 1972, the Act contained a concise “savings clause”   that was intended to keep EPA from meddling with the authority of the States to determine how water resources will be allocated for beneficial uses. Section 510(2) simply states:  “Except as expressly provided in this chapter, nothing in this chapter shall be construed as impairing or in any manner affecting any right or jurisdiction of the States with respect to the waters (including boundary waters) of such States.” 

Wyoming Senator Malcolm Wallop became very concerned that the Section 510(2) “shield” wasn’t strong enough to protect the States, so he successfully led to passage in the 1977 amendments to the Act a much more robust policy statement, which was codified as Section 101(g), as follows:

It is the policy of Congress that the authority of each State to allocate quantities of water within its jurisdiction shall not be superseded, abrogated or otherwise impaired by this chapter. It is the further policy of Congress that nothing in this chapter shall be construed to supersede or abrogate rights to quantities of water which have been established by any State. Federal agencies shall co-operate with State and local agencies to develop comprehensive solutions to prevent, reduce and eliminate pollution in concert with programs for managing water resources. 

On its face, the Wallop Amendment appears to be “bulletproof,” but at best  it’s really just “bullet resistant.” On November 7, 1978, EPA Assistant Administrator for Water and Waste Management Thomas Jorling and General Counsel Joan Burnstein issued to all Regional Administrators an “interpretive memorandum,” which concluded that the Wallop Amendment does not absolutely prohibit legitimate use of the Act for water quality purposes, even if water rights and water usages allowed under State laws are negatively affected.  While noting that Section 510(2) remained unchanged in the 1977 amendments, Jorling and Burnstein grounded their legal analysis principally in passages from Senator Wallop’s floor statement in support of his proposed amendment. Specifically, Senator Wallop acknowledged that implementation of water quality standards requirements, among other major features of the Act, might “incidentally” affect individual water rights, and that the purpose of his amendment was “to insure that State allocation systems are not subverted, and that effects on individual rights, if any, are prompted by legitimate and necessary water quality considerations.”

So, thus was born what could loosely be called the “legitimate and necessary” test for determining what is, or is not, an “incidental” effect on State-conferred water rights resulting from implementation of water quality programs arising under the Act. But, without further definition, the scope of this determination brings to mind another (and historic) subjective test – the language in the 1964 Supreme Court decision in the Jacobellis obscenity case, in which Mr. Justice Potter Stewart, in his Concurring Opinion, wrote: “I shall not today attempt further to define the kinds of material I understand to be embraced within that shorthand description ["hard-core pornography"], and perhaps I could never succeed in intelligibly doing so. But I know it when I see it….”

In 1994, the Supreme Court essentially applied the Wallop Amendment test  in its P.U.D. No. 1 vs. the Washington Department of Ecology decision.  There, as a condition for the issuance of a Water Quality Certification under Section 401 of the Act, the State required a proposed hydroelectric dam to pass through certain minimum flows to protect downstream fisheries.  In holding for the State, the Court cited Senator Wallop’s floor statement and summarily rejected the argument that Sections 101(g) and 510(2) limit the reach of the Act to water quality issues only.

Considering the legislative history of the Wallop Amendment, the 1978 Jorling-Burnstein interpretive memorandum, and the Supreme Court’s decision in  the 1994 P.U.D. No. 1 case, there is understandable angst that EPA (or anybody else, for that matter) will use one or more of the three bedrock water quality factors in Section 101(a) of the Act (i.e. chemical, physical, and biological) as offensive weapons to limit or block State water allocation proposals.  Simply put, the scientific premise would be that instream ecosystems can be degraded by depleting flows below the point at which sustainability of these resources is compromised, thus causing or exacerbating a violation of the biological component of the established water quality standards at the proposed point of withdrawal.  (Of course, antidegradation requirements would also be in play.)

On January 7, 2015, EPA sent to the Office of Management and Budget for regulatory review the proposed Final Rule in the recent Water Quality Standards Program rulemaking, and EPA projects that the Final Rule will be published in May 2015.  To say the very least, these major changes will make even more vexing the already difficult quantity-quality, federal-state tensions over how water use allocation decisions are made at the State level.

To close this review, it must be noted that, as mentioned in the 1978 Jorling-Burnstein interpretive memorandum, some States have water allocation programs in which the impacts on water quality of a proposed withdrawal must be carefully considered.  For example, in Mississippi, the statute authorizing the issuance of surface water withdrawal permits explicitly states: “No use of water shall be authorized that will impair the effect of stream standards set under the pollution control laws of this state based upon a minimum stream flow.” An appropriate case in point arose in early 2014, when a permit was sought to withdraw significant volumes of water for row crop irrigation purposes from a major stream in the Mississippi Delta.  A citizens group opposed the permit proposal, contending that further withdrawals from that particular stream should not be allowed until a biological sustainability study was performed and then used as the ultimate determinant in considering applications for additional withdrawals.  The citizens group and the applicant for the permit struck a compromise, but the fundamental questions about the impacts of such withdrawals on water quality remain.

Given the extended droughts in certain regions of the United States in recent years, the ever tightening laws and regulations governing both water quantity and water quality, and the reality of growing demands for water seemingly everywhere, “water wars” (both intrastate and interstate) will likely erupt more frequently as time goes by.  And, in those States that have little or no statutes, regulations, and administrative procedures to work with, the fundamental questions for individuals and organizations (public and private) who want to oppose proposed water withdrawals, regardless of the intended beneficial use, will be what forum to use and what principles of law to assert. One thing is certain – seasoned water lawyers will likely see more business coming their way.

The New Mexico Copper Mine Rule: Questions of Groundwater Jurisdiction with a Sprinkle of Political Wrangling

Posted on October 29, 2014 by Thomas Hnasko

The unfortunate fact about copper mining is that it just cannot be done without impacting groundwater.  This inevitable result occurs because of the massive excavations extending below groundwater elevations and the leaching of contaminants through the process of capturing copper.  Most western mining states, including Arizona, have recognized this inevitable consequence and have crafted a “point of compliance” system where groundwater quality standards must be achieved at some designated point beyond the active mining site.  Previously, the New Mexico Environment Department dealt with quality exceedances at active mining sites either by issuing variances from compliance requirements under the New Mexico Water Quality Act, or by simply ignoring the problem altogether.  The Copper Mine Rule has been promoted as a pragmatic response to the cumbersome administrative variance procedure.

Under the New Mexico Water Quality Act, groundwater compliance must be achieved at any “place of withdrawal for present or reasonably foreseeable future use.”  This jurisdictional threshold is markedly different than the jurisdictional standard for surface water discharges, which requires compliance precisely at the point of discharge into a body of surface water.  The Copper Mine Rule recognizes that groundwater directly beneath an active mine site would not be available for use during the period of active mining operations and thus would not qualify as a “place of withdrawal” where groundwater standards must be met.  Similar to the “point of compliance” approach taken by other states, the New Mexico Copper Mine Rule requires that groundwater standards must be achieved at monitoring well locations placed as close as practicable around the perimeter of the active mine site. 

The Copper Mine Rule has been appealed by various NGOs and by the New Mexico Attorney General.  The Attorney General contends on appeal that any determination of a “place of withdrawal” must be made on a case-by-case basis, rather than through a rule-making procedure.  Interestingly, the Attorney General originally represented the New Mexico Water Quality Control Commission (“WQCC”) when it adopted the Copper Mine Rule, but abruptly reversed course and has lodged an appeal against the Rule for which it provided representation to the WQCC.  As part of the response to the Attorney General’s appeal, the WQCC has filed a motion seeking to disqualify the Attorney General, based on a conflict of interest, from taking positions adverse to its former client.  The matter is presently pending before the New Mexico Court of Appeals.

Reducing Phosphorus to Wisconsin Waters – Another Tool in the Toolkit

Posted on July 2, 2014 by Linda Bochert

Imagine a nutrient reduction program that achieves financially manageable point source reductions while generating new cash for nonpoint source reductions, has bi-partisan support and requires no new state regulatory or fee programs.  Not possible you say?  Meet the Wisconsin Clean Waters, Healthy Economy Act, now codified at Wis. Stat. s. 283.16.

 In prior postings, I have described Wisconsin’s phosphorus reduction rule, including its compliance options of water quality trading and adaptive management. These are innovative alternatives to traditional construction but, unfortunately, not viable for all dischargers.

Now Wisconsin has another tool:  a multi-discharger variance, based on a finding of statewide social and economic impact, available to dischargers that cannot meet the water quality based effluent limitation (WQBEL) for phosphorus without a major facility upgrade.   Under the variance, a point source will still be required to decrease its phosphorus discharge -- meeting interim limitations of 0.8 mg/L, 0.6 mg/L, 0.5 mg/L, and the final WQBEL over four WPDES permit terms; and while doing so will make payments to the counties within its basin, providing cost-share dollars for nonpoint source phosphorus reductions.  At $50/pound for the difference between the actual pounds of phosphorus discharged and the target value of 0.2 mg/L, this is expected to generate real money -- which the counties will use to implement existing, but seriously underfunded, nonpoint source reduction programs.

Because point sources have installed treatment and reduced their phosphorus discharges by 90% or more to meet Wisconsin’s prior technology-based limit of 1.0 mg/L, the remaining primary contributors of phosphorus to our waters are nonpoint sources.  Yet getting funding for nonpoint source controls has been an ongoing, and largely unsuccessful, effort.  For context, the Green Bay Metropolitan Sewerage District (GBMSD) currently removes about 95% of the phosphorus it receives; while the wastewater it discharges accounts for less than 3% of the total phosphorus to the lower Green Bay.  With an investment of $200 million in capital improvements GBMSD could increase its removal to 98% -- a reduction of less than 2% of the total phosphorus load to the bay.   Redirecting significant dollars to nonpoint source programs should be a game-changer.

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) has been reissuing WPDES permits with phosphorus WQBELs and compliance schedules based on the phosphorus reduction rule that went into effect in December 2010.  The variance law went into effect on April 25, 2014, but won’t become available to WPDES permit holders until approved by USEPA.  The rule package is expected to be sent to USEPA for approval in January 2015, once the statewide economic impact analysis is completed. 

We have an opportunity for creative and meaningful point source and nonpoint source participation in reducing phosphorus discharges to our waters.  But time is of the essence.  Note to USEPA:  there is much to like here – please don’t let the moment pass us by.

EPA’s RDA Math: 3 + 9 ≠ 1

Posted on June 20, 2014 by David Van Slyke

In a surprising turn of events, on March 12, 2014 EPA Regions 1, 3 and 9 each simultaneously but separately responded, and each in a somewhat different way, to three virtually identical NGO petitions asking those Regions to use their Clean Water Act (“CWA”) Residual Designation Authority (“RDA”) to require that stormwater discharges from impervious surfaces at existing commercial, industrial and institutional (“CII”) sites be permitted under CWA Section 402.  The three petitions were filed in July 2013 by several different and somewhat overlapping consortia of environmental organizations.

The three Regions’ responses were all signed by their respective Regional administrators, each was worded differently, and each included a somewhat similar -- yet somewhat different --explanatory enclosure that detailed the basis of each respective Region’s response.

EPA Region 3’s response is a flat out denial of the petition, citing existing tools and programs already in place to address stormwater pollution (e.g., MS4 permits, TMDL implementation and strong state programs).  The enclosure with the Regional Administrator’s letter denying the petition also states that “Region III declines to begin a process for categorical designation of discharges from CII sites to impaired waters since … the data supplied by the Petitioners to support the exercise of RDA is insufficient.”  The enclosure does note that if the existing programs ultimately do not meet their objectives, alternate tools, including RDA, will need to be considered.

Similarly, EPA Region 9’s response “declines to make a Region-wide designation of the sources” in the petition specific to Region 9.  That response also concludes in the enclosure that “we currently have insufficient information to support a Region-wide designation” of the CII sites specified in the petition, “that effective programs are already in place that address the majority of the sites identified in the petition,” and that the Region will keep designation in their toolbag as they “continue to evaluate currently unregulated sources of stormwater runoff.”

However, Region 1’s response states that it “is neither granting the petition … nor is it denying the petition.”  Instead, the Region is going to evaluate individual watersheds in its six states to look at the nature and extent of impairment caused by stormwater, and then “to determine whether and the extent to which exercise of RDA is appropriate.”

Given the identical language in certain portions of all three of the Regional response enclosures (e.g., Statutory and Regulatory Background; Petition Review Criteria), it is clear that EPA Headquarters was in the thick of the discussions regarding the responses to these three RDA petitions.  However, the apparent autonomy afforded each Region in determining how to deal with the issue is remarkable, and the discussions ultimately may have centered (as they often do at EPA HQ) on resource allocations nationally and within each Region. 

The responses of Regions 3 and 9 imply that their current respective paths, with time, will get results without diverting resources.  EPA Region 1 appears to more fully embrace RDA as a near-term viable tool to more aggressively control stormwater runoff from CII sites.  Apparently, the New England regulators’ successful experience with the Long Creek Watershed RDA and their efforts relative to the RDA process for the Charles River has only whetted their appetite for further candidate areas at which to employ this model to address impaired stormwater. 

Whether the NGOs will seek judicial relief from the denial of their Petitions, whether the states in the USA’s upper right hand corner will be supportive of EPA New England’s continued utilization of this tool, as well as how this issue ultimately will be played by EPA HQ, is fuzzy math.