Cool Water

Posted on December 11, 2012 by Paul Seals

The song “Cool Water” was written and recorded in 1936 by Bob Nolan, an original member of the Sons of the Pioneers along with Len Slye, better known by his film name, Roy Rogers.  “Cool Water” could be the theme song for Texas and other water-short western states.  The Texas Water Development Board recently compiled “Water for Texas 2012 State Water Plan”.   Quite simply, Texas does not have enough water to meet its current needs, much less its future needs, during periods of serious drought conditions.   Texas is searching for cool, clear water.

Texas continues to grow.  According to the Plan, the population of Texas is expected to increase 82 percent between 2010 and 2060, from 25.4 million to 46.3 million.   Water needs are projected to increase by 22 percent, from 18 million acre-feet per year to 22 million acre feet per year in 2060.  At the same time as water demand is rising, existing water supplies are diminishing by almost 2 million acre feet per year.   Where will the additional water supplies be found to meet the identified needs?

The State Water Plan includes recommended water management strategies developed by regional planning groups, which include: conservation, drought management, conjunctive use of surface and groundwater, surface water reservoirs, aquifer storage, groundwater development, water reuse, desalination plants.  In addition to addressing surface and groundwater water rights, water planners and users will need to confront the environmental implications of these strategies.  What are the environmental regulatory constraints and impediments?

The implications and potential conflicts are far-reaching.  We can all anticipate the obvious regulatory hurdles,  contested procedures and property rights obstacles that projects to develop new surface reservoirs will confront.  But what of other strategies like water conservation and reuse?    Proposing water conservation (e.g. increased cooling water cycles) and reuse (e.g. use of treated municipal wastewater effluent) at a natural-gas fired power plant may  threaten surface water quality as the total dissolved solids to be discharged are concentrated through these strategies.   Also, what kinds of measures and alternatives under other environmental regulatory programs (e.g. Endangered Species Act) will need to be considered as these strategies are proposed?

The history of Texas is growth.   To do nothing to meet its increasing  water needs would result in staggering economic losses.    Texas met the challenge after the drought of record in the 1950s.  Texas will do it again!   The question is:  “how happy will the trails be?”



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